Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2011

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Stephen B. Gilbert

Second Advisor

Jonathan W. Kelly

Abstract

A 360-degree video becomes necessary in applications ranging from surveillance to virtual reality. This thesis focuses on developing an interface for a system such as mobile surveillance that integrates 360-degree video feeds for remote navigation and observation in unfamiliar environments. An experiment evaluated the effectiveness of three 360-degree view user interfaces to identify the necessary display characteristics that allow observers to correctly interpret 360-degree video images displayed on a desktop screen. Video feeds were simulated, using a game engine. Interfaces were compared, based on spatial cognition and participants' performance in finding target objects. Results suggest that 1) correct perception of direction within a 360-degree display is not correlated with a correct understanding of spatial relationships within the observed environment, 2) visual boundaries in the interface may increase spatial understanding, and 3) increased video gaming experience may be correlated with better spatial understanding of an environment observed in 360-degrees. This research will assist designers of 360-degree video systems to design optimal user interface for navigation and observation of remote environments.

Copyright Owner

Wutthigrai Boonsuk

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-06

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

70 pages

Included in

Psychology Commons

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