Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2011

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Political Science

First Advisor

Richard W. Mansbach

Abstract

This thesis is an exploratory look into the relationship between the strength of state- based identities and globalization. I argue that the differences in the state-based identity of Estonia and Moldova help explain their relative openness towards globalization. State-based identity strength is indicated by three factors: First, common culture - a solid collective memory that ties past, current, and future identity to the state. Second, language - indigenous language reinforces state-based identity, whereas vestiges of empire and a language foisted

on the people by outsiders indicates a weaker state-based identity. Thirdly, state policies - education, citizenship requirements, and public holidays are used to illustrate how the state communicates identity to the population and molds loyalty of the collective. I find Estonia has a stronger state-based identity and engages with globalizing influences, whilst the weaker state-based identity of Moldova epitomizes the defensive perception of global influences leading to undermining state-based loyalties, therefore Moldova concentrates on internal issues, and is less engaging with globalization.

Copyright Owner

Rachael Anne Voas

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-06

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

92 pages

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