Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2011

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Gary L. Wells

Second Advisor

Stephanie Madon

Abstract

This research extended the traditional conceptualization of the postidentification feedback effect beyond retrospective self-reports to include the effects of feedback on eyewitnesses' recognition memory for the originally-witnessed culprit. Participant-witnesses made inaccurate identifications and were given confirming, disconfirming, or no feedback. Forty-eight hours later, witnesses were tested on their recognition memory for the culprit originally viewed. Disconfirming feedback inhibited witnesses' ability to discriminate between the culprit and never-before-seen filler photos. Witnesses who did not receive feedback showed the highest memory performance overall. These results provide preliminary support for the idea that postidentification feedback negatively affects eyewitness recognition memory.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-1225

Copyright Owner

Laura Smalarz

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-28

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

59 pages

Included in

Psychology Commons

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