Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2009

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

First Advisor

Matthew C. Frank

Abstract

This research involves the investigation of process parameters for a new rapid machining process designed for metal foams. Metal foams are structures that contain a network of interconnected pores throughout the structure and surrounding surfaces. Traditional machining methods break down the pore walls of metal foams, creating a smeared surface finish with little to no surface porosity. The described research tasks include defining the significant process parameters for machining complex geometries of a metal foam, Trabecular MetalTM, commonly used in medical applications. It was found that feed rate significantly reduces the effect of surface smear, especially at faster rates. Machining with harder infiltrant materials and in a cryogenic environment will also better maintain surface porosity during machining. The impact of this research will allow for the creation of complex porous parts with a variety of applications including custom artificial bone implants.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-591

Copyright Owner

Christopher Vaira Hunt

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-29

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

111 pages

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