Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2010

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

English

First Advisor

Barbara S. Schwarte

Abstract

This study analyses whether social standings of interlocutors (a student and a professor) and linguistic forms embedded into head speech acts of requests affect the perceptions of Russian learners of English as a foreign language about the appropriateness of requests. By completing an elaborated semi-oral Discourse Completion Task, twenty American undergraduate students produced eighty request utterances. The most frequent and consistent request patterns were then used to form five different types of head speech acts. These five head speech act forms were then evaluated by thirty-nine Russian EFL learners. To do the evaluation, Russian subjects completed an acceptability questionnaire that involved a ten-point Likert-type evaluation scale and a written protocol. The findings of the study partially support the hypothesis that Russian EFL learners evaluate more conventionally indirect request patterns as more appropriate when they are aimed at the professor and as less appropriate when they are aimed at the student.

Copyright Owner

Ekaterina Victorovna Shcherbakova

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-30

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

151 pages

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