Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2010

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Susan E. Cross

Abstract

At the present time, little is known about the factors involved in self-forgiveness. In order to advance theoretical and empirical knowledge in this area, several correlates of self-forgiveness for interpersonal and intrapersonal transgressions were examined. Across two studies, participants wrote about a previous interpersonal or intrapersonal transgression (Study 1; N = 198) or imagined themselves in a particular interpersonal or intrapersonal transgression situation (Study 2; N = 240) and then responded to items related to the transgression. Analyses revealed that emotions focused on the event (i.e., shame, guilt, and rumination) were critical factors in the self-forgiveness process. In addition, other categories of variables (perceived forgiveness/conciliatory behaviors, offense-related, personality/individual difference, and relationship) were linked to self-forgiveness. The implications for future self-forgiveness research are discussed.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-2907

Copyright Owner

Kari A. Terzino

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-30

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

121 pages

Included in

Psychology Commons

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