Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2010

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Norman Scott

Abstract

This experimental deception study explored how undergraduate online research participants from a large Midwestern university (n = 182) perceived, comprehended, and acted upon consent documents involving potential loss of genetic privacy. Risk perception, willingness to participate, and consent behavior were measured across manipulations of four randomly assigned experimental consent documents composed of two levels of privacy risk (identifiable or anonymous genetic storage) and two monetary compensation values ($10 or $100). Poor comprehension of the consent information was observed. When risk level was comprehended, identifiable genetic storage was associated with lower participation. Monetary compensation of $100 did not alter willingness to participate or consent behavior, but it significantly decreased risk perceptions, suggesting participants may be susceptible to undue influence.

Copyright Owner

Paul Lawrence Ascheman

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-30

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

228 pages

Included in

Psychology Commons

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