Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2008

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Natural Resource Ecology and Management

First Advisor

W. Sue Fairbanks

Second Advisor

James L. Pease

Abstract

Wildlife management decisions must be made with an understanding of the species and its relationship to stakeholders. However, relationships between Native American stakeholders and Pispiza, black-tailed prairie dogs, have not been examined even though the majority of prairie dog occupied habitat exists on Tribal lands. I addressed this gap in the literature by examining Pispiza-related attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation.

A total of 109 high school students, culturally knowledgeable community members, and randomly selected general community members completed questionnaires administered interview style. Factor analysis and stepwise regressions explored potential relationships between stakeholder groups and attitudes and knowledge. Factors with significant effects included cultural differences and ranching experience. The evidence of such relationships, in addition to social justice, demands macro-level investigations and explanations in future research. Additionally, Tribes must not be excluded from Pispiza conservation and management decisions nor left shouldering the majority of the conservation "burden."

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-41

Copyright Owner

Jeanne Diane Spaur

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-30

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

95 pages

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