Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2011

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Natural Resource Ecology and Management

Major

Sustainable Agriculture

First Advisor

Richard C. Schultz

Second Advisor

Thomas M. Isenhart

Abstract

This study measures soil loss from ephemeral gully (EG) channels, sediment delivery from a small watershed containing an EG, and compares those results to WEPP-generated results. A total of 79 metric tons of soil was observed to be lost in 2009 from 20 EG channels measured. For the 18 runoff events measured in a small watershed (0.35 ha) containing an EG, a total of 50 metric tons of sediment was delivered to the outlet. WEPP performed poorly at predicting soil loss and sediment delivery. In addition, the study examined factors contributing to the connectivity of EGs to stream networks. Canopy cover was the only measured factor positively and significantly correlated with EG connectivity, indicating that dense, rooted vegetation is important in stopping EGs. Finally, interviews with farmers of the study area suggested that maintenance/operating ease, an in-field conservation ethic, and local leadership were factors that influenced conservation-related management decisions.

Copyright Owner

Nicholaus Reid Ohde

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-30

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

79 pages

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