Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2011

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Animal Science

First Advisor

Max F. Rothschild

Abstract

A livestock development program was established in Kamuli district, in 2003, as a collaborative effort between Iowa State University and a Ugandan development organization, to improve the income and nutrition of rural farming households. Interviews were conducted with 113 farmers in the program, to assess the impact of the program. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Relationships between variables were confirmed using Chi square tests.

The farmer's objectives and resources dictated the choice of animal species and number of animals reared. Animal prices varied depending on the farmer's need for the money and what the buyer was willing to pay. Farmers rarely slaughtered their animals to eat; they more frequently consumed eggs and milk. Training and facilitation was of advantage to the farmers, but factors, such as the farmers' resources limited their progress. Men and women farmers sometimes experienced the program differently because of factors such as inequality in education, access to information and time use differences.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-1075

Copyright Owner

Agatha Ampaire

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-30

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

108 pages

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