Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2011

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

First Advisor

Patricia Leigh

Second Advisor

James Mcshay

Abstract

Self-authorships provided the theoretical lens for this exploration of a blended learning multicultural course. Universities must help students develop a complex array of capacities to function effectively in today's interconnected world. Self-authorship provides a framework to analyze student development across three domains: cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal. Self-authorship development can be fostered through the use of the Learning Partnerships Model.

This qualitative study used the theory of self-authorship to analyze interactions in the online discussion portion of one section of twenty-one students in a multicultural course at a rural Midwestern university. The course used dialogic principles in a blended learning environment, combining face-to-face interactions with an online platform which supported online journaling, a variety of resources including articles and videos, and an online discussion forum. Six students were interviewed to determine self-authorship development. Their interactions with classmates in the online discussion were analyzed.

Some evidence of students' self-authorship development was found. Lack of facilitation in the online discussion appeared to have the potential to engender some resistance. A number of suggestions for course improvement could be made based on literature on dialogic principles, optimal online discussion formations and the Learning Partnerships Model.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-2857

Copyright Owner

Vicki Rae Abel

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-30

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

126 pages

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