Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2011

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Stephen B. Gilbert

Second Advisor

William F. Woodman

Abstract

The juxtaposition of classic sociological theory and the, relatively, young discipline of human-computer interaction (HCI) serves as a powerful mechanism for both exploring the theoretical impacts of technology on human interactions as well as the application of technological systems to moderate interactions. It is the intent of this dissertation to contribute to the knowledge of both HCI and sociology through a brief discussion of the state of sociological theory and its shortcomings, the design and evaluation of a system to promote social affinity in dyadic work, a method for empirically measuring affinity free from the social desirability bias of surveys, and a proposal for a new direction for HCI to include classic sociological theories. Ultimately, this dissertation serves as an introduction to a series of future research projects by laying the theoretical and methodological foundations for exploring indirect technological mediation of social interactions.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-1365

Copyright Owner

Michael Oren

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-30

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

190 pages

Included in

Psychology Commons

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