Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2012

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Lisa M Larson

Abstract

Women account for nearly half of the workforce, yet remain underrepresented in leadership positions. It was proposed that stereotype threat effect (Steele & Aronson, 1995) may provide an explanation for why there are a disproportionately lower number of female leaders. This study looked to expand upon the findings of Davies, Spencer, and Steele (2005) that showed interest in obtaining leadership positions were decreased when stereotype threat was activated. After being presented with a being randomly assigned to a stereotype activation or identity safe condition, 124 female participants completed leadership-specific interest and confidence measures. To account for personality differences, responses from the Social Potency Primary Scale from the MPQ (Tellegen, 1982; 2000) were used as a covariate. Contrary to expectations, no significant differences were identified for the measures between conditions. Possible explanations for the present results, study limitations, and future research implications regarding stereotype threat and leadership interest are discussed.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-2307

Copyright Owner

Dustin Forrest Baker

Language

en

Date Available

2012-10-31

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

98 pages

Included in

Psychology Commons

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