Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2012

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Susan E Cross

Abstract

The anticipation of others' affect was hypothesized to influence individuals' self-regulation in personal and interpersonal goal pursuits. A scenario questionnaire study suggested that people tend to show higher motivation levels when they think about significant others' future positive affect and lower motivation levels when they think about significant others' future negative affect. Individuals high in relational-interdependent self-construal tend to have stronger effects of anticipated emotions on self-regulation intentions. A behavioral study suggested that both perceived competitiveness of the environment and individual differences in perspective taking influence the effects of anticipated emotions on self-regulation of interpersonal goal pursuit. These findings support the hypothesis that future-oriented affect influences self-regulation in an interpersonal context.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-1142

Copyright Owner

Meng Zhang

Language

en

Date Available

2014-10-31

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

102 pages

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