Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2012

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

History

First Advisor

Kathleen Hilliard

Abstract

Typically, railroad studies of communities in the antebellum fall into one of two broad categories. Either a town was a well-established market center that constructed a railroad to increase its reach, or a frontier community largely established and ran at the railroad's discretion. Largely overlooked, however, has been the contribution of a unique subset of Midwestern towns and cities, such as Davenport, Iowa. Utilizing governmental documents, internal railroad documents, and local newspaper, this thesis examines the planning, politics, construction, and eventual shift in relationship of the city into a more regional and national context. This reveals Davenport's entanglement and oversized influence in railroad, land grant, and financial issues at a broad level, while navigating increasingly complex relationships with other communities in Iowa, sectionalism in Congress, and the railroads themselves.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-606

Copyright Owner

Chad Allan Hauser

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

102 pages

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