Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2010

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Food Science and Human Nutrition

First Advisor

Wendy S. White

Abstract

The objectives of the study were to define the dose-response relation of the amount of added oil and: 1) the absorption of carotenoids, phylloquinone and tocopherols in salad vegetables and 2) the absorption of retinyl palmitate formed from the ingested provitamin A carotenoids, ¦Á- and ¦Â-carotene. Women (n = 12) each consumed 5 salads containing equivalent amounts of carrot, cherry tomato, romaine lettuce and spinach. The salads with salad dressings containing 0, 2, 4, 8 or 32 g tocopherol-stripped soybean oil were ingested in random order separated by ¡Ý 2 weeks. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 2, 3.5, 5, 7, and 9.5 h postprandially. Chylomicron fractions were extracted and analyzed by HPLC with coulometric array electrochemical detection. When the salads were ingested with 0 g oil, there was negligible absorption of ¦Á- and ¦Â-carotenes, lutein, lycopene, phylloquinone, retinyl palmitate, ¦Á- and ¦Ã-tocopherols. For ¦Á- and ¦Â-carotenes, lycopene, retinyl palmitate, and ¦Á- and ¦Ã-tocopherols, absorption was increased with each amount of oil compared with 0 g oil (P <0.05). Starting from 4 g oil, all analytes (¦Á-carotene, ¦Â-carotene, lutein, trans-lycopene, vitamin A, ¦Á-tocopherol, ¦Ã-tocopherol, and vitamin K1) showed significant increases in absorption compared with 0 g oil salad dressing. The absorption of each carotenoid and fat-soluble vitamin was highest with 32 g ingested oil (P < 0.002).

Copyright Owner

Agatha Agustiana

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

96 pages

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