Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2010

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Entomology

Major

Toxicology

First Advisor

Joel R. Coats

Abstract

The use of conventional synthetic insecticides is facing increased scrutiny due to environmental and mammalian health concerns along with resistance to target insects. This has led to an investigation of alternative control measures to combat both economically and medically important arthropods. Octopamine, a biogenic amine, has significant physiological functions in invertebrates, including insects, and signals through G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Co-evolution of plants with insects has led to plants adapting defensive mechanisms to deter herbivore, microbial, or viral attack. This is sometimes accomplished via the production of essential oils that are composed of a variety of compounds, in particular monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids and aromatic compounds. Here we report on the functional coupling of a ligand-independent α-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor from the American cockroach and its expression in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This expression system allows us to screen a large number of compounds to determine efficacy at this octopamine receptor. We have found many monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids and aromatic compounds from essential oils that interact with this octopamine receptor and may account for their insecticidal action in this insect.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-3626

Copyright Owner

Aaron Donald Gross

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

101 pages

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