Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2014

Degree Name

Master of Fine Arts

Department

Art and Design

First Advisor

Frederic Malven

Abstract

Wayfinding is a phenomenon that has been studied over several years. It may have diverse terms and definitions, but the goal has always been to reach a particular destination with the help of environmental information and cognitive mapping.

As complex as conventional wayfinding is; creating an effective design for blind users is even more problematic. It is vital to create a space that is inclusive, yet effective to fit the user needs. The goal should be meshing majority needs with minority needs without compromising the aesthetics or effectiveness of the design. As designers, we aim to provide efficient wayshowing through our design practices. However, most of this comprises of visual cues and aestheics; which would not cater to a blind user. This thesis aims to challenge this problem by contributing non-visual cues in addition to visual aesthetics that are normally deliberated.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-3803

Copyright Owner

Meghana Veeramachaneni

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

153 pages

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