Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2015

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Sociology

First Advisor

Robert E. Mazur

Abstract

Migrants, especially those working as unskilled laborers, often experience social, cultural, economic exclusion which can negatively impact their health. Rural-to-urban migrants in China, a country with more than 166 million rural migrants in 2013, suffer serious institutional discrimination under the household registration system (Hukou). The influence of several key socioeconomic and health related factors on China's rural migrants' health satisfaction were analyzed, using data from the Longitudinal Survey on Rural Urban Migration in China (RUMiC) 2009. Using OLS regression, factors that are significantly and positively associated with health satisfaction level are education, urban-rural income differences, low expenditures on medical services, perceived health status, and psychological status. Monthly household income and financial linkages were not significant, and lower occupational status was moderately associated with health satisfaction level, contrary to expectation. Possible explanations such as migrants' underestimating their health problems and implications of these findings in China for other countries experiencing similar migration are discussed.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-4059

Copyright Owner

Jingfeng Liu

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

37 pages

Included in

Sociology Commons

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