Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2015

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Lisa M. Larson

Abstract

The current study observed the relation between psychological distress, stigma (public and self) and help-seeking attitudes for career and personal concerns. In particular, the study examined the contribution of psychological distress and stigma (public and self) to help-seeking attitudes. A total of 510 (N = 202 for career and N =308 for personal) students at a large Midwestern university completed an online survey in fall 2014. Data was analyzed using hierarchical moderated multiple regression. First, neither career distress nor personal distress contributed significant variance to help-seeking attitudes. Second, stigma (public and self), for both career and personal concerns, contributed significant variance to help-seeking attitudes; the relations were negative. Third, neither the interactions of career distress and public stigma nor personal distress and public stigma contributed significant variance to help-seeking attitudes. Last, the interaction of career distress and self-stigma did not contribute significant variance to help-seeking attitudes, but the interaction of personal distress and self-stigma did contribute significant variance. Results were discussed based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), modified labeling theory (MLT) and approach-avoidance models. Limitations, implications, and future studies were discussed.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-4268

Copyright Owner

Spurty Surapaneni

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

111 pages

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