Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2016

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Education

Major

Education

First Advisor

Amy C. Hutchison

Abstract

This study examined the processes used by literacy teachers when planning to integrate technology into their instruction and the usefulness of the Technology Integration Planning Cycle (TIPC; Hutchison & Woodward, 2014a) for framing teachers’ planning processes. Three participants from a larger technology integration project completed a think-aloud session as they planned an upcoming literacy lesson in which they anticipated using technology. This study was designed as a think-aloud study (Pressley & Afflerbach, 1995; Cho & Woodward, 2014) with extensive complementary data (Cho, 2014; Coiro & Dobler, 2007; Zhang & Duke, 2011). In addition to concurrent and retrospective verbal protocols, data sources included: interviews, surveys and questionnaires, observations, and documents and photos. Analysis of data collected from these sources was conducted in two cycles, open-ended coding (Corbin & Strauss, 2008) then hypothesis coding (Saldaña, 2016). Findings indicated that participants utilized pedagogical content knowledge and technological pedagogical content knowledge in different ways when planning. Notably, misunderstandings about content knowledge may be somewhat accommodated by integrating technology into literacy instruction. Further, teachers each had different stances towards integrating technology that influenced their planned instruction. Finally, while most elements of the TIPC were found in the participants’ planning, teachers varied in their ability to focus on the instructional goal. Conceptual, methodological, and instructional implications are discussed.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-4820

Copyright Owner

Lindsay Woodward

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

154 pages

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