Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2017

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Sociology

Major

Sociology

First Advisor

Matthew DeLisi

Abstract

Over the past decade, an increasing number of scholars have begun to explore the link between experiences of interpersonal racial discrimination and an increased risk of offending. The evidence shows that racial discrimination is a risk factor and that ethnic-racial socialization (ERS) provides resilience. However, much of the research on this phenomenon is largely focused on African American males. Drawing on Burt, Simons, and Gibbon’s (2012) research, I investigate the ways in which interpersonal racial discrimination increases the risk of offending among African American females and whether familial ERS practices provide resilience to its criminogenic effects. Using panel data from the Family and Community Health Study (FACHS), a survey of African American families in Georgia and Iowa, I examine the relationship between experiences of racial discrimination and an increased likelihood of offending to explore if ethnic-racial socialization provides protective effects against the criminogenic nature of racial discrimination. Using negative binomial regression to analyze my data and a black feminist criminological lens, the results indicate that racial discrimination is linked to a higher likelihood of criminal offending for African American girls. However, little support is found that provides evidence of ERS’ protective effects for African American girls.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-4876

Copyright Owner

Alexia Angton

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

61 pages

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