Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2017

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

Major

Psychology

First Advisor

Christian A. Meissner

Abstract

The negation effect refers to the cognitive detriment associated with correctly saying “no” (a negation), compared to correctly saying “yes” (an affirmation). A recent study has shown this detriment for item memory following the negation of a feature of an item (Mayo, Schul, & Rosenthal, 2014). This research examines the replicability of the negation effect using the original paradigm, as well as an adapted list-learning paradigm. Participants studied a set of objects and were then asked questions about features of objects that elicited “yes” or “no” responses. After a filler task, participants completed a final memory test during which they indicated whether a given object label was present or not present during the study phase.

Experiment 1 failed to conceptually replicate the negation-induced forgetting effect present in Mayo et al. (2014) using a list-learning paradigm. Experiment 2 was a pre-registered replication, and the negation effect was successfully replicated using the original stimulus and test materials from Mayo et al. (2014). Experiment 3 successfully replicated the negation effect using a list-learning paradigm, and found that the magnitude of the negation effect is influenced by the number of alternatives suggested by a feature statement.

Copyright Owner

Rachel Elizabeth Dianiska

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

66 pages

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