Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2017

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

English

Major

Rhetoric and Professional Communication

First Advisor

Geoffrey F. Sauer

Abstract

Writing programs at numerous universities—including the Georgia Institute of Technology, Iowa State University, Miami University of Ohio, Virginia Tech, and Purdue University—are incorporating more learning about multimodal communication into their curricula, including written, oral, visual, and electronic communication (WOVE). Within WOVE, electronic technologies enable students to produce, distribute, and consume written, visual, oral, and electronic communication (Ong 1982; Bush 1945; Eisenstein 1979, Lauer 2009, 2014). Integrating cloud technologies into writing programs may be difficult because it requires ongoing training, support, and maintenance, but it may be worthwhile because it helps produce a writing culture mediated by these technologies. I use activity theory (Kaptelinin & Nardi 2006, Russell 1997) to argue that participant techne—as the knowledge of an art with a focus on the method of production—is an influential component of cloud-supported composition culture. And I demonstrate how cloud technologies may be written into course overview documents with modularity and social information.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-4999

Copyright Owner

Philippe Peter Meister

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

80 pages

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