Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2017

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

Major

Psychology

First Advisor

Lisa M. Larson

Abstract

Environmental factors (faculty integration and student integration) and self-determination theory factors (perceived autonomy, perceived competence, and perceived relatedness) were used to predict academic major satisfaction. It was hypothesized that environmental factors and self-determination factors would directly predict major satisfaction. In line with this, it was predicted that a path model which included environmental factors would prove to be a better fit than a model that did not. It was also predicted that environmental factors would directly predict self-determination factors, and that self-determination factors would mediate the relation between environmental factors and major satisfaction. Path analysis was used to test the hypotheses. In a sample of 332 college students, it was found that environmental factors did not directly predict major satisfaction, and a path model which included environmental factors was not a better fit. Environmental factors did indirectly predict major satisfaction, with self-determination factors as a mediator. Self-determination factors were directly predicted by environmental factors, and did directly predict major satisfaction. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed.

Keywords: academic major satisfaction, perceived autonomy, perceived competence, perceived relatedness, perceived autonomy, faculty integration, student integration

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-5035

Copyright Owner

Mary Catherine Schenkenfelder

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

98 pages

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