Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2017

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Human Development and Family Studies

Major

Family and Consumer Sciences

First Advisor

Amie Zarling

Second Advisor

Janet M. Melby

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) significantly impact social, behavioral and health problems over the lifetime. Research has found that early exposure to adverse experiences are linked to subsequent long term outcomes such as intimate partner violence (IPV). However, there is relatively limited qualitative research on the early experiences in the lives of intimate partner perpetrators. Therefore, through a life-course theoretical lens, this study aims to understand early lived experiences of IPV perpetrators. A content analysis was performed on interviews with 112 men convicted for domestic violence. From this analysis three interconnected themes emerged: (1) family history of criminality, (2) disrupted relationships with parents, and (3) youth misbehavior. Understanding the early life histories of men who have been arrested for domestic assault is crucial as it helps to recognize context potentially influencing their current situation. The results highlight the need to critically investigate the early lives of perpetrators of IPV for prevention and intervention purposes.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-5100

Copyright Owner

Maria B. Alcivar-Zuniga

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

55 pages

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