Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2017

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Anthropology

Major

Anthropology

First Advisor

Jill D. Pruetz

Abstract

Crop-raiding by nonhuman primates is one of the most common of human-alloprimate interactions, often translating into conflict and reduced tolerance. Although it has not been reported to be as problematic in the Neotropics, examining this interaction is important for identifying potential conflicts and incorporating adequate management practices. In the community of Gandoca, Costa Rica, residents coexist with three sympatric primates: Alouatta palliata, Cebus imitator, and Ateles geoffroyi ornatus. We examined the attitudes and perceptions of 24 individuals towards alloprimates and how crop-raiding influenced them. We evaluated the intensity of such conflict as perceived by the community through semi-structured interviews. Although 75% of the respondents said that crop-raiding was not problematic, 23 animals were identified to raid crops and/or gardens. The three nonhuman primates were reported to raid gardens and crops, but Alouatta more so than Cebus and Ateles. Interestingly, they were all described as “wasteful” when feeding, and this behavior seemed to “bother” people more than the raiding itself. Moreover, Alouatta was more likely to be described negatively, Cebus more neutrally, and Ateles more positively. In conclusion, raiding behaviors affect the residents’ attitudes and perceptions, but other behaviors and physical traits may also factor into people’s perceptions of monkeys.

Copyright Owner

Giselle M Narvaez Rivera

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

90 pages

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