Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2016

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Kinesiology

Major

Kinesiology

First Advisor

Elizabeth Stegemöller

Abstract

Studies have shown repetitive finger movement performance in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) may be rate dependent. When performing acoustically cued repetitive finger movements at rates near to and above 2 Hz, they exhibit increased movement rate, reduced movement amplitude, and loss of phase accompanied by frequent hesitations. The relationship between this movement deficit and functional fine motor tasks in people with PD is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine if people with PD who demonstrate repetitive finger movement impairment at rates near to and above 2 Hz perform worse on a buttoning task and a Purdue pegboard task compared to those that do not demonstrate repetitive finger movement impairment at rates near to and above 2 Hz. Forty-eight participants with PD completed an acoustically cued repetitive finger movement task, incrementing from a rate of 1 Hz to 3 Hz in 0.25 Hz. Movement rate and movement amplitude was compared to participants’ performance at 1 Hz and 1.25 Hz, respectively. Participants with PD were divided into groups based upon changes in movement rate and movement amplitude at rates near to and above 2 Hz. Participants also completed a buttoning and Purdue pegboard assembly task. Buttoning and Purdue pegboard performance was compared between groups.

For movement rate, there were no significant differences between the fast rate group (moved faster than the tone at rates near to and above 2 Hz) and the normal group (those that were within 2 SD of the tone rate) on the buttoning and Purdue Pegboard tasks. Similarly, there were no significant differences between subgroups for movement amplitude alone on the functional tasks. This study demonstrated that changes in movement rate and movement amplitude during the performance of repetitive finger movement at rates near to and above 2 Hz have differential relationships to performance of functional fine motor tasks in persons with PD. Consideration and evaluation of both movement rate and movement amplitude, separately, may have clinical applications in the treatment of people with PD.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-5454

Copyright Owner

Jennifer Uzochukwu

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

72 pages

Included in

Kinesiology Commons

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