Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2016

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Apparel, Events and Hospitality Management

Major

Apparel, Merchandising, and Design

First Advisor

Eulanda A. Sanders

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore kiltmakers’ experiences as practitioners and their perspectives regarding the possibility of Protected Geographic Indication (PGI) status or Certification Mark for the Scottish kiltmaking industry, with the aim of helping to transform protection for these individuals’ livelihood. Utilizing a phenomenological approach, this study explored the experiences of both learner and expert kiltmakers, along with those of teachers and administrators in schools and firms in the greater Edinburgh and Highland regions of Scotland. An emphasis was placed on discovering participants’ experiences relating to the processes of learning and practicing kiltmaking; the industrial, cultural, and governmental forces impacting kiltmaking; gender issues experienced by female kiltmakers; the evolution of the kilt as a cultural symbol, garment, and industry; and the possibility of establishing Protected Geographic Indication (PGI) or Certification Mark protections on Scottish-made kilts.

Participants agreed: (a) kilts and kiltmakers are an important component of Scottish cultural heritage, (b) support from government, industry, and educational institutions is essential in order to perpetuate the kiltmaking practice, (c) the development of well-defined standards for authentic Scottish kilts is beneficial, (d) learning is accomplished by Scaffolding in both apprenticeship and certification, and kiltmakers engage in life-long learning, and (e) protection for the kiltmaking industry is desirable; however, kiltmakers are not sure how it would be accomplished. Participants’ experiences were grouped into internal (i.e., passion and a commitment to tradition that leads to learning kiltmaking) and external (i.e., interactions with industry and government). Cultural experiences such as family history emerged as bridging the gap between internal and external experiences for participants, with kiltmakers noting that as producers of Scottish National Dress, they are both stewards of a piece of Scottish culture, while being simultaneously impacted by the larger set of Scottish cultural norms and values.

A graphical representation of participants’ experiences emerged from the data, and the theoretical concepts of Social Capital, Cultural Transmission, Scaffolding, Feminism, and Culture assisted in elucidating the results. This study’s aim was to better understand experiences of individuals in the Scottish kiltmaking community and to begin a stream of scholarly literature devoted to kilts and kiltmaking. Therefore, the present study adds to the body of knowledge by exploring an iconic cultural garment that has been largely ignored in scholarship, along with those who carry on the long-standing tradition of Scottish kiltmaking.

Participants agreed: (a) kilts and kiltmakers are an important component of Scottish cultural heritage, (b) support from government, industry, and educational institutions is essential in order to perpetuate the kiltmaking practice, (c) the development of well-defined standards for authentic Scottish kilts is beneficial, (d) learning is accomplished by Scaffolding in both apprenticeship and certification, and kiltmakers engage in life-long learning, and (e) protection for the kiltmaking industry is desirable; however, kiltmakers are not sure how it would be accomplished. Participants’ experiences were grouped into internal (i.e., passion and a commitment to tradition that leads to learning kiltmaking) and external (i.e., interactions with industry and government). Cultural experiences such as family history emerged as bridging the gap between internal and external experiences for participants, with kiltmakers noting that as producers of Scottish National Dress, they are both stewards of a piece of Scottish culture, while being simultaneously impacted by the larger set of Scottish cultural norms and values.

A graphical representation of participants’ experiences emerged from the data, and the theoretical concepts of Social Capital, Cultural Transmission, Scaffolding, Feminism, and Culture assisted in elucidating the results. This study’s aim was to better understand experiences of individuals in the Scottish kiltmaking community and to begin a stream of scholarly literature devoted to kilts and kiltmaking. Therefore, the present study adds to the body of knowledge by exploring an iconic cultural garment that has been largely ignored in scholarship, along with those who carry on the long-standing tradition of Scottish kiltmaking.

Copyright Owner

David Paul Loranger

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

247 pages

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