Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2018

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Anthropology

Major

Anthropology

First Advisor

Jill Pruetz

Second Advisor

Grant Arndt

Abstract

Primates are a unique taxon of organisms found to have complex communication, behavior, sociality and in turn, life histories. One of the areas of primate study with relatively little current knowledge is regarding natural polyspecific interactions in which two different species interact in a mutualistic or commensalistic relation suggested to be due to predation threats or foraging benefits. While polyspecific associations have been identified in a wide array of organisms including primate species, the causes are not always clear. Causes are suggested to include reducing predation threats and the ability to communicate information, particularly about predators. This paper will review the current knowledge on primate predation, vocal communication, and naturally occurring polyspecific associations before highlighting the current gaps in the literature. It will attempt to show what is presently understood about the influence of predation on behaviors, knowledge of communication systems, and known polyspecific interactions across the Order Primates. The current openings in the subject materials will be discussed and steps forward will be suggested. A new method of understanding polyspecific interactions and the primate life features related with the associations through different scopes will be presented as a new direction for the field.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-5975

Copyright Owner

Kaelyn Melinne Dobson

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

101 pages

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