Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2018

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

Major

Neuroscience; Psychology

First Advisor

Eric E. Cooper

Abstract

Previous research suggests that categorical perception may interfere with a novice artist’s ability to accurately draw simple shapes. Specifically, when asked to draw two shapes of slightly different sizes, participants tend to exaggerate the categorical difference between the two and draw the small shape too small. Similarly, participants tend to draw oblique angles more oblique than they should be when they are close to perpendicular or overlapping. The current set of experiments investigated whether these categorical errors could predict participants’ drawing ability on a more complex drawing task. A simple linear regression revealed that categorical errors in angle could significantly predict participants’ scores on a face drawing task. In addition several training methods commonly used in art classes were evaluated for their effectiveness to reduce these types of errors for novice participants compared to a control training method and results indicated that explicit knowledge of the categorical and coordinate systems reduced overall errors, while the grid technique and sighting reduced categorical errors.

Copyright Owner

Larissa F. Arnold

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

77 pages

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