Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2018

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Major

Industrial and Agricultural Technology

First Advisor

Gretchen A. Mosher

Abstract

Grain dust explosions result in fatalities, injuries, and downtimes in industry operations. Industry training has been implemented to educate workers on grain dust hazards and prevention tools and methods but no comprehensive evaluation has taken place. This research used the decision-making simulation to evaluate the effectiveness of two training formats for grain dust explosion programming using a four-level Kirkpatrick evaluation model. In addition, the association between the format of training and the decision choices made by workers and the information they used to make decision choices were examined. This research also examined the association between workers' level of perceived training effectiveness and the decision choices made by workers and the information they used to make decision choices. A web-based survey was used as a platform for the decision-making simulation. The survey was sent to 260 individuals who had completed an online or face-to-face grain dust explosion prevention training. Results from this research suggest that both the online and face-to-face training were effective in terms of delivering knowledge and increasing the awareness of grain dust hazards. The format of training was not found to be significantly associated with workers' decision choices and information used to make a decision choice. Similarly, workers' level of perceived training effectiveness was not found to be significantly associated with workers decision choices and information used to make a decision choice. Implications and recommendations for the grain dust explosion prevention training offered in online and face-to-face formats are shared.

Copyright Owner

Wesley Tzungju Chang

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

87 pages

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