Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2018

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

Major

Psychology

First Advisor

Lisa M. Larson

Abstract

The current study observed the relation between public stigma, self-stigma, student-perceived mother stigma, student-perceived father stigma, and help-seeking intentions for three ethnic groups: Asians, Asian Americans, and Caucasian Americans. A total of 804 (N = 319 Asians, N = 160 Asian Americans, and N =325 for Caucasian Americans) students at a large Midwestern university completed an online survey in fall 2016 and spring 2017. Data was analyzed using path analyses (MPlus 7.2) and hierarchical multiple regressions (SPSS 22). First, Vogel et al. (2007) stigma model (see Figure 1, 2) was a good fit for Asians, Asian Americans, and Caucasian Americans although self-stigma did not relate to intentions to seek help for Asian Americans. Second, the parent stigma model (see Figure 5), adding on student-perceived mother stigma and student-perceived father stigma to the Vogel et al. (2007) stigma model, was a better fit for Asians, but not for Asian Americans and Caucasian Americans. Last, Asian Americans and Caucasian Americans did not significantly vary on any paths of the parent stigma model. However, Asians did significantly vary from Asian Americans and Caucasian Americans. In particular, the relation of student-perceived mother stigma to self-stigma was significant for Asians but not Asian Americans, the relation of public stigma to help-seeking intentions was significant for Asians but not Caucasian Americans, and the relation of public stigma to self-stigma was significantly stronger for Caucasian Americans than Asians. Results were discussed based on prior research and cultural differences. Limitations, implications, and future studies were discussed.

Copyright Owner

Spurty Surapaneni

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

108 pages

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