Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2018

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Human Development and Family Studies

Major

Human Development and Family Studies

First Advisor

Tricia K. Neppl

Abstract

The present dissertation provides critical contributions to the study of LGBTQ+ college students by examining the role of family and microaggressions on both intimate partner violence and identity development. Specifically, the role of interparental conflict, harsh parenting, and microaggressions on psychological perpetration and victimization; and the role of parental rejection, sexuality specific support, and microaggressions on both positive and negative identity were assessed. Findings illustrate that while mother interparental conflict, mother harsh parenting, and microaggressions were all significantly correlated with psychological victimization and perpetration, once all variables were added to the model, only microaggressions were significantly positively associated with both perpetration and victimization of psychological violence. For identity development, mother and father parental rejection positively influenced negative identity while sexuality specific support and microaggressions influenced positive identity. Also, moderation by participant gender was not supported. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

Copyright Owner

Ashley Breanne Taylor

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

116 pages

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