Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2019

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Kinesiology

Major

Kinesiology

First Advisor

Elizabeth Stegemöller

Abstract

Around three million concussions happen in the United States from sport and recreational activity alone, and it is estimated 50% of concussions go undiagnosed. Collegiate athletes have been found to not report their symptoms of concussion mainly because they felt their symptoms were not severe enough and they did not think there were any long-term consequences from continuing to play. This study attempts to find if preseason concussion education for collegiate hockey players and club athletes changes their perceptions about concussions, and if these changes are maintained after returning to sport/competition. This study used three identical surveys over three time points to evaluate concussion perception before preseason concussion education, immediately after preseason concussion education, and two to three weeks after returning to in-season/competition. Survey results suggest preseason concussion education is effective at increasing likelihood and confidence of reporting signs and symptoms of concussion in teammates and themselves, (F(3)= 25.317, p < 0.001). This study shows preseason concussion education as an effective method in making athletes more confident and likely to report possible concussions.

Copyright Owner

Dana Edward Cash

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

56 pages

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