Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2017

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Kinesiology

Major

Kinesiology

First Advisor

Ann Smiley-Oyen

Abstract

Recent human motor adaptation/learning studies revealed that punishment accelerates acquisition of motor memory while reward enhances consolidation of motor memory. This study tested the robustness and a possible cause for this potential dissociation. During learning to adapt to an abrupt visual rotation in moving to a visual target, young healthy participants were provided with performance-based monetary reward or punishment. By manipulating the probability of reward or punishment distribution and controlling visual feedback of the cursor while moving to a target, the present study demonstrated that punishment induced faster adaptation than reward in both continuous and non-continuous visual feedback contexts when punishment and reward were distributed in all adaptation trials. However, only reward combined with continuous visual feedback of the cursor resulted in offline consolidation improvement. In contrast, offline consolidation of punishment-induced adaptation memory was inhibited in the continuous visual feedback context. A word-list learning task immediately after the adaptation training reduced this inhibition of punishment-induced adaptation memory, while having no influence on the consolidation of reward-induced adaptation memory. These findings suggest that punishment, compared to reward, induced more efficient explicit process in the adaptation phase, but stronger explicit memory suppressed the consolidation of the punishment-induced motor memory.

Copyright Owner

Yanlong Song

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

119 pages

Included in

Kinesiology Commons

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