Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2019

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

Major

Psychology

First Advisor

Eric E. Cooper

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted to determine why there is a local improvement in recognition times when object images are inverted. Experiment 1 used naturally occurring, everyday objects and measured the effects of picture plane rotation on their identification times. Performance varied according to spatial configuration type, wherein only side-of objects become easier to recognize upon complete inversion than at neighboring orientations, forming a “dip”. Above-below objects became increasingly difficult to recognize as rotation approaches 180 degrees. Experiment 2 employed novel non-sense objects in a sequential matching paradigm. Rotation function shapes displayed an interaction in the same direction as Experiment 1, though no “dip’ in response times was observed. In Experiment 2, experimenter prescribed categorical part relations influenced the shape of rotation functions for recognition independent from other object properties. Rotation functions revealed that obtaining this counter-intuitive local improvement depends upon the presence of side-of relations between an object’s parts. Together, these experiments provide evidence for the use of categorically coded structural descriptions in object recognition.

Copyright Owner

Charles Josef Peasley

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

54 pages

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