Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2020

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Major

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

First Advisor

Matthew Darr

Abstract

Boom height control is important for field performance when applying chemicals or fertilizer. Booms can be controlled through passive or active control. Active control requires software and components to control the tilt cylinders of the boom. Hydraulic components have a key role in this, but can also be the limiting factor in reducing off-target spray application. The sensitivity of the core hydraulic components for boom height control were evaluated using a virtual machine model of an agricultural sprayer. Significant improvements were identified by changing factors of the hydraulic control system. From the sensitivity analysis, 78 single factor configurations were tested. The field profiles represented light, mild, and severe terrain conditions a sprayer may encounter in the field. Factors such as lag times, tilt cylinder velocities, and tilt cylinder time constants all proved to have statistical significance in positive trends of system performance. Future research on the component analysis of self-propelled sprayers could be testing different control gains or physical testing with different valves, pumps, and cylinders.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-20200624-173

Copyright Owner

Jacob Rewerts

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

60 pages

Available for download on Thursday, June 16, 2022

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