Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2020

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

Major

Psychology (Counseling Psychology)

First Advisor

Loreto Prieto

Abstract

Betrayal trauma theory asserts that traumas imposed by trusted individuals are more detrimental than those traumas imposed by unknown individuals or nature, because of the level of mistrust and insecurity generated by these events in survivors. As such, individuals experiencing betrayal traumas are more likely to experience post-event stress symptoms, such as insecurity in their romantic relationships and difficulties with regulating their emotions. Empirical research demonstrates that those with a history of interpersonal trauma, insecure attachment styles, and difficulties with emotion regulation experience greater degrees of dissatisfaction with their adult romantic relationships. The purpose of my study was to examine how insecure attachment styles and emotion dysregulation serially mediate the direct relation between betrayal trauma experiences and relationship satisfaction. Results indicated that, for participants endorsing higher levels of anxious attachment, either a lack of emotional awareness or lack of emotional clarity serially mediated the direct relation between betrayal trauma experiences and relationship satisfaction. As well, for participants endorsing higher levels of avoidant attachment, a lack of emotional clarity serially mediated the direct relation between betrayal trauma experiences and relationship satisfaction. Implications for future research concerning the role of attachment style and emotion regulation in the context of betrayal trauma history and romantic relationship satisfaction, as well as implications for clinical work in this area, are discussed.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-20200902-19

Copyright Owner

Amanda Katherine Buduris

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

158 pages

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