Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2020

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

Major

Psychology

First Advisor

Gary L. Wells

Abstract

Police routinely give eyewitnesses multiple opportunities to identify the same suspect, and numerous exoneration cases demonstrate that this practice can contribute to wrongful convictions. Empirical research addressing this practice shows it can lead to the repeated-suspect effect, which is a significant increase in suspect identifications after the same suspect has been presented in a previous showup or lineup (Steblay & Dysart, 2016). Procedures that tend to increase the chance of innocent suspect identifications are considered suggestive and produce unreliable eyewitness decisions. Thus, the use of multiple identification opportunities is considered suggestive and are discouraged by researchers (Wells et al., 2020). Despite this, eyewitness testimony obtained using suggestive procedures is frequently used at trial anyway because it is still admissible in court if other criteria are met indicating the identification was “nevertheless reliable” (Manson v. Brathwaite, 1977; Wells & Quinlivan, 2009). This dissertation builds on past research in this area by examining the effect of more the one intervening lineup and biased intervening lineups containing the same innocent suspect in two experiments, and how these different intervening lineup manipulations impact identification outcomes, confidence, and mechanism-related questions.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-20200902-123

Copyright Owner

Adele M Quigley-McBride

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

235 pages

Share

COinS