Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2020

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

Major

Psychology (Counseling Psychology)

First Advisor

Lisa M Larson

Abstract

The relation between supportive faculty behaviors and academic major satisfaction was examined through a lens of self-determination theory. It was hypothesized that supportive faculty behaviors would predict academic major satisfaction indirectly through basic psychological needs in the classroom (perceived volitional autonomy, perceived competence, relatedness) and academic motivation. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypotheses. In a sample of 331 college students, supportive faculty behaviors did not directly predict academic major satisfaction but did indirectly predict academic major satisfaction through perceived competence in class, relatedness in class, and academic motivation. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed.

Keywords: academic major satisfaction, perceived autonomy, perceived competence, perceived relatedness, academic motivation, self-determination theory, nonverbal immediacy, verbal immediacy, faculty behavior

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-20200902-138

Copyright Owner

Mary Schenkenfelder

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

137 pages

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