Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2020

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Geological and Atmospheric Sciences

Major

Meteorology

First Advisor

Tsing-Chang (Mike) Chen

Abstract

The exact causes for the precipitation patterns in the Central U.S. Plains, especially the springtime rainfall maximum and the following summertime drought, is not fully understood. Previous studies have been completed to investigate the subject, but their focus has been on the Great Plains Low Level Jet. Other studies have been completed to research how large-scale circulations affect weather patterns. However, none have attempted to make the connection directly between large-scale circulations and precipitation patterns specifically for the Central U.S. Plains. In this study, monthly average values from the year 2010 relating to moisture, wind, and water vapor transport are examined to see if there is a connection to large-scale circulation patterns. The final results of this study show that while the Low-Level Jet is a major influence on moisture and precipitation in the Central U.S. Plains during this springtime rainfall maximum, a combination of certain upper-level patterns, water vapor transport, and the Low-Level Jet explain the complex relationship that results in a maintenance of the springtime rainfall maximum (and the summertime dryness that follows) in the Central Great Plains, particularly in Iowa.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-20210114-15

Copyright Owner

Kierstin Rene Blomberg

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

54 pages

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