Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2020

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Agronomy

Major

Plant Breeding

First Advisor

Thomas Lübberstedt

Abstract

In 2050 the world population will reach 9.7 billion people, and feeding a growing population will only be possible if the overall food production increases (FAO 2018). However, considering limited resources such as land and water along with climate change, an increase in yield for major crops (e.g., maize) seems not to be a straightforward goal to accomplish. Continued crop improvement is obtained by increasing genetic gain using the most modern technologies such as DNA markers, predictive statistics, and advanced breeding techniques. Doubled haploid (DH) technology plays a crucial role in shortening generation cycles for significantly improving genetic gain. However, the efficiency of this technology is affected by some traits such as i) haploid inducibility, ii) kernel abortion rates, and iii) genome doubling. To optimize the double haploid breeding we have to better understand the molecular basis of these traits. Therefore, the objective of this thesis was to identify the genomic regions and candidate genes associated with these traits.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-20210114-35

Copyright Owner

Arthur Da Silva

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

84 pages

Available for download on Friday, January 07, 2022

Share

COinS