Campus Units

Food Science and Human Nutrition, Political Science

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

7-2021

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Volume

53

Issue

7

First Page

564

Last Page

572

DOI

10.1016/j.jneb.2021.04.459

Abstract

Objective

To assess the prevalence of plant-based alternatives to meat consumption in students at a Midwest university, describe associations between demographics, environmental concern attitudes, and consumption, and determine variables statistically associated with trying the plant-based alternatives.

Design

Descriptive cross-sectional convenience sample; self-administered online surveys.

Setting

College students at a Midwest university.

Participants

Currently enrolled students aged 18–30 taking courses on campus as of March 2020.

Main Outcome Measures

Plant-based alternative consumption; demographics; vegetarian status; environmental attitudes; influences on food choices; and trusted sources of food information.

Analysis

Bivariate comparisons for consumption of plant-based alternatives; logistic regression analysis.

Results

Fifty-five percent had tried a plant-based meat alternative. Top reasons were enjoying new foods and curiosity about the products. Out-of-state residency, vegetarian status, and 10 of 11 environmental attitude statements were significantly associated with plant-based alternative consumption (P < 0.05). About 30% of consumers indicated they wanted to eat less meat and that plant alternatives were better for the environment. Nonconsumers had less favorable views of meatless meals.

Conclusions and Implications

This study supports that positive environmental attitudes were predictive of plant-based alternative consumption among college students. Increased awareness and familiarity could encourage consumption among this population.

Comments

This article is published as Elizabeth D. Davitt, Donna M. Winham, Michelle M. Heer, Mack C. Shelley, Simon T. Knoblauch, Predictors of Plant-Based Alternatives to Meat Consumption in Midwest. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, July 2021, 53(7); 564-572. Doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2021.04.459.

Copyright Owner

The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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