Campus Units

Food Science and Human Nutrition

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

4-17-2012

Journal or Book Title

International Journal of Food Properties

Volume

15

Issue

3

First Page

613

Last Page

627

DOI

10.1080/10942912.2010.494758

Abstract

The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (483 and 676 MPa at 20°C for 5 min) and heat treatment (63°C for 30 min and 72°C for 15 s) of milk on the rheological properties of coagulant-induced milk gels were investigated. The rheological properties of gels were determined using a dynamic Physica Rheometer and Texture Analyzer. Milk turbidity was measured by a spectrophotometer. The gels produced from a pressure of 483 MPa had higher storage modulus (G*) and firmer gel at cutting compared to heated milks. Increasing the pressure to 676 MPa caused a reduction in G*, less firm gels, and an increase in milk turbidity compared to 483 MPa and heated milks. The differences between the gels formed from different pressure- and heat-treated milks, suggesting that the structure network of gels were considerably altered by high hydrostatic pressure treatment of milk. Disruption of casein micelles and denaturation of whey proteins caused by high hydrostatic pressure treatments were responsible for most of the effects observed in this study. In general, pressurizing the milk at 483 MPa at 20°C was a promising treatment for the manufacture of coagulant-induced milk gels with good rheological properties; however, pressurization at 676 MPa could not be recommended.

Comments

This article is published as Anas Al-Nabulsi , Reyad Shaker , Tareq Osaili , Stephanie Clark , Federico Harte & Gustavo Barbosa-Cánovas (2012) Impact of High Hydrostatic Pressure and Heat Treatments on Milk Gel Properties: A Comparative Rheological Study, International Journal of Food Properties, 15:3, 613-627, DOI: 10.1080/10942912.2010.494758

Copyright Owner

Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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