Campus Units

Geological and Atmospheric Sciences

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

9-4-2008

Journal or Book Title

Mineralogy and Petrology

Volume

94

Issue

175

DOI

10.1007/s00710-008-0019-0

Abstract

Precious metals accompany all types of epithermal deposits. In general, the largest of these deposits occur in intrusive or extrusive rocks of alkaline or calc-alkaline affinity. The Apigania Bay vein system and Au–Ag mineralization is hosted in Mesozoic marbles and schists, and is composed primarily of five nearly parallel, high-angle quartz veins that extend for at least 200 m. Gold–silver mineralization, in association with more than thirty ore and vein minerals, is developed in three stages and occurs at the contact of marbles and schists. Zones of epidote–chlorite–calcite and sericite–albite alteration are associated with precious metal-bearing milky and clear quartz veins. Fluid inclusion studies suggest that hydrothermal mineralization was deposited under hydrostatic pressures of ~100 bars, at temperature of 120–235°C, from low to moderate, calcium-bearing, saline fluids of 0.2 to 6.8 equiv. wt.% NaCl. Calculated isotope compositions (δ18O = −4.7‰ to 1.7‰ and δD = −120‰ to −80‰) for waters in equilibrium with milky and clear quartz are consistent with mixing with dilute, low temperature meteoric ore fluids. Calculated δ 13CCO2 (0.6‰ to 1.1‰) and δ 34SH2S (−7.3 to −0.3‰) compositions of the ore fluids indicate exchange, in an open system, with a metasedimentary source. Gold and silver deposition was associated with degassing of hydrogen due to intense uplift of the mineralizing area. The physicochemical conditions of mineralization stages I to III range between 200°C and 150°C, fS2=10−18.1" role="presentation" style="box-sizing: inherit; display: inline; line-height: normal; word-spacing: normal; overflow-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; border: 0px; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; position: relative;">fS2=10−18.1fS2=10−18.1 to 10−16.8, fO2=10−44.0" role="presentation" style="box-sizing: inherit; display: inline; line-height: normal; word-spacing: normal; overflow-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; border: 0px; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; position: relative;">fO2=10−44.0fO2=10−44.0 to 10−41.5, pH = 6.9 to7.6, fH2S=10−3.4" role="presentation" style="box-sizing: inherit; display: inline; line-height: normal; word-spacing: normal; overflow-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; border: 0px; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; position: relative;">fH2S=10−3.4fH2S=10−3.4 to 10−2.6 and aH2S=10−2.7" role="presentation" style="box-sizing: inherit; display: inline; line-height: normal; word-spacing: normal; overflow-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; border: 0px; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; position: relative;">aH2S=10−2.7aH2S=10−2.7 to 10−2.6. Apigania Bay could be possibly considered the latest evolutional phase of Tinos hydrothermal system.

Comments

This article is published as Tombros, S.F., St. Seymour, K., Williams-Jones, A.E. et al. Later stages of evolution of an epithermal system: Au–Ag mineralizations at Apigania Bay, Tinos Island, Cyclades, Hellas, Greece. Miner Petrol 94, 175 (2008). doi:10.1007/s00710-008-0019-0.

Rights

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0), which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Copyright Owner

The Author(s)

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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