Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2004

Journal or Book Title

Family Economics and Nutrition Review

Volume

16

Issue

2

First Page

41

Last Page

48

Abstract

Poverty, food insecurity, and hunger are increasing across the Nation as Federal, State, and local economies continue to struggle. In 2003, the official U.S. poverty rate was 12.5 percent (35.9 million people), up from 12.1 percent (34.6 million people) in 2002 (DeNavas-Walt, Proctor, & Mills, 2004). Meeting nutritional needs is particularly troublesome for poor families: More than 12 million households (11.1 percent) have reported food-related hardships due to insufficient resources; 3.8 million (3.5 percent) households have reported experiencing hunger (Nord, Andrews, & Carlson, 2003). Further, households with children have been reported as being twice as likely to be food insecure, compared with households without children (Nord et al., 2003).

Comments

This article is from Family Economics and Nutrition Review 16 (2004): 41–48.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS