Campus Units

Human Development and Family Studies

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-2008

Journal or Book Title

Clinical Gerontologist

Volume

31

Issue

4

First Page

97

Last Page

121

DOI

10.1080/07317110802143974

Abstract

Older adults, the primary consumers of prescription medications in the United States, may be particularly prone to medication side effects. The present study examined the relation between change in prescriptions and change in cognitive performance (i.e., inductive reasoning and everyday problem solving), as well as how three common classes of medication (i.e., cardiovascular, hormone/synthetic substitutes, and central nervous system agents) were related to cognitive performance. Data were collected from 78 community-dwelling older adults (M = 71.14 years, SD = 5.35) over an 18-month period. Results indicated that types of drugs were differentially related to cognitive change and that the total number of prescriptions was related to change in cognitive performance. Clinical and research advantages of using specific cognitive and prescription assessments, rather than more global measures, are discussed.

Comments

This article is published as Margrett, Jennifer M., Brian Ayotte, Sherry L. Willis, and Grace IL Caskie. "The relation between prescription drug usage and cognitive performance in later life." Clinical Gerontologist 31, no. 4 (2008): 97-121. 10.1080/07317110802143974. Posted with permission.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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