Campus Units

Human Development and Family Studies

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2013

Journal or Book Title

The Journal of Bioscience and Medicine

Volume

2

Issue

1

First Page

124

Abstract

Objective

Brain donation and neuropathological examination of brain tissues is the only way to obtain definitive diagnostic information on research subjects enrolled in aging studies. We investigated predictors of brain donation in a population-based study of centenarians in Phase III of the Georgia Centenarian Study (GCS).

Methods

Sixty-six individuals (mean age = 100.6 years, 91% female, 20% African American) were successfully recruited from the core sample of 244 individuals residing in 44 counties of Northeast Georgia to provide brain donation.

Results

Bivariate (t-tests, chi-square tests) and multivariate analyses (logistic regression) showed no significant differences between donors and non-donors across a wide range of demographic, religious, personality, cognitive and physical functioning characteristics.

Conclusions

We succeeded in recruiting a diverse, population-based sample of centenarians for brain donation. Our findings also suggest that barriers to brain donation reported in other studies may have less impact in these exceptional survivors.

Comments

This article is published as Shaw, Kathy, Marla Gearing, Adam Davey, Molly Burgess, Leonard W. Poon, Peter Martin, and Robert C. Green. "Successful recruitment of centenarians for post-mortem brain donation: results from the Georgia Centenarian Study." The journal of bioscience and medicine 2, no. 1 (2012). Posted with permission.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Copyright Owner

Scientific Research Publishing

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Gerontology Commons

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