Campus Units

Human Development and Family Studies

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2011

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Aging Research

Volume

2011

First Page

953031

DOI

10.4061/2011/953031

Abstract

The aim of this investigation was to determine how cognitive performance was associated with positive and negative affect and life satisfaction over time. This study involved a secondary longitudinal analysis of cross-section data collected at Phase I (1988–1992) and during an 18-month longitudinal followup at Phase II (1992–1998) of the Georgia Centenarian Study. Participants included 𝑁 = 1 3 7 centenarians at Time 1 and 𝑁 = 6 8survivors at Time 2. Significant stability in cognitive impairment existed at Time 1 and Time 2 for positive (𝛽 = . 5 5 , 𝑃 < . 0 1) and negative affect (𝛽 = . 5 4 , 𝑃 < . 0 1) models. Negative affect at Time 1 was associated with lower life satisfaction at Time 1 (𝛽 = βˆ’ . 4 2 , 𝑃 < . 0 1 ). In addition, cognitive impairment at Time 2 was associated with decreased positive emotionality at Time 2 (𝛽 = βˆ’ . 3 9, 𝑃 > . 0 1). Furthermore, greater positive affect at Time 2 was associated with greater satisfaction with life at Time 2 (𝛽 = . 3 5 , 𝑃 < . 0 1). It appears that positive emotionality contemporaneously influences the association between cognitive impairment and life satisfaction among centenarians. Implications relative to improving life satisfaction among centenarians are discussed.

Comments

This article is published as Bishop, Alex J., Peter Martin, Leonard Poon, and Mary Ann Johnson. "Exploring positive and negative affect as key indicators of life satisfaction among centenarians: does cognitive performance matter?." Journal of aging research 2011 (2011). 10.4061/2011/953031

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Copyright Owner

The Authors

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Gerontology Commons

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